Apr 15, 2018
Some 23rd Psalm: Goodness & Mercy – Re. Gary Hilton – Gen. 2:9, 16-17; Ps. 22:1-2; Ps. 23
Series: Easter
"The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want...for thou art with me..." the famous line from Psalm 23, acknowledging fulness and fulfillment in God's presence and provision. But how many times does our faith reflect this feeling...how often do we make our faith contingent on how much we get from God or how much we know about God? Faith is not attained when we understand everything about God, nor is it sustained by what we get God to do for us; faith is strengthened when we are left with no choice but to trust what is revealed to us about God – in good times and in bad. We see this evidence itself through Psalms 22 and 23, as the psalmist, King David, comes to a greater realization of faith while suffering great things. He cries out in desperation, feeling as though God has forsaken him, a feeling that we can all relate to. And as David works through this hardship, he reminds himself of the truths he knows about God: "The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want..." and then makes the pivotal transition to talking to God and acknowledges how God continues to be with him. Let us take David's cue, remind ourselves that God is always with us, guiding us and protecting us – and in all season of life say; "The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want...for you are with me."
WatchNotesDownloadDateTitle
  • Apr 15, 2018Some 23rd Psalm: Goodness & Mercy – Re. Gary Hilton – Gen. 2:9, 16-17; Ps. 22:1-2; Ps. 23
    Apr 15, 2018
    Some 23rd Psalm: Goodness & Mercy – Re. Gary Hilton – Gen. 2:9, 16-17; Ps. 22:1-2; Ps. 23
    Series: Easter
    "The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want...for thou art with me..." the famous line from Psalm 23, acknowledging fulness and fulfillment in God's presence and provision. But how many times does our faith reflect this feeling...how often do we make our faith contingent on how much we get from God or how much we know about God? Faith is not attained when we understand everything about God, nor is it sustained by what we get God to do for us; faith is strengthened when we are left with no choice but to trust what is revealed to us about God – in good times and in bad. We see this evidence itself through Psalms 22 and 23, as the psalmist, King David, comes to a greater realization of faith while suffering great things. He cries out in desperation, feeling as though God has forsaken him, a feeling that we can all relate to. And as David works through this hardship, he reminds himself of the truths he knows about God: "The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want..." and then makes the pivotal transition to talking to God and acknowledges how God continues to be with him. Let us take David's cue, remind ourselves that God is always with us, guiding us and protecting us – and in all season of life say; "The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want...for you are with me."
  • Apr 8, 2018“Everyday Easter” – Rev. Allan Brooks – John 20:11-16
    Apr 8, 2018
    “Everyday Easter” – Rev. Allan Brooks – John 20:11-16
    Series: Easter
    Easter may be celebrated one day each year, but the realities of the resurrection that we celebrate last year round. We are an Easter people, living in Christ's resurrection; which means that Jesus is still alive and at work in the world and in our lives everyday. We know that the tomb was not the end Christ's resurrection work, rather it truly began with His resurrection. And so we live with the joy of Easter and the resurrection power, to join Jesus in His redeeming work throughout the world.
  • Apr 1, 2018“The Good News of Easter” – Rev. Allan Brooks – John 20:1-8
    Apr 1, 2018
    “The Good News of Easter” – Rev. Allan Brooks – John 20:1-8
    Series: Easter
    Hear the Good News of the Resurrection! That Jesus not only died to redeem you from your sins, but that he has risen and overcome the grave. In His resurrection, Christ has conquered death that the price for our sins may be paid once and for all, in order that we may return to a right relationship with God. We are greeted on Easter morning with an opened grace, an empty tomb and an overwhelming number of questions; "how?" But in this baffling mystery, we are invited into the power of Jesus' resurrection, to live lives that declare and express His great love for the world. Hear the Good News of the Resurrection! Christ is risen! He is risen, indeed! Jesus is alive and raises you to new life with Him!
  • Mar 25, 2018“Release the Prisoners” – Rev. Gary Hilton – John 12:12-16 & Luke 23:13-25
    Mar 25, 2018
    “Release the Prisoners” – Rev. Gary Hilton – John 12:12-16 & Luke 23:13-25
    Series: Lent
    They called him savior and messiah, shouted hosanna and hailed him as a conquering king. They were right to do so, but were blind to what he would a conquer and save them from. A hundred years earlier, Israel was liberated from Greek oppression by an old priest and his family who lead a resistance campaign to reclaim the Temple and restore independence to Israel as recorded in the Old Testament Apocrypha of the Maccabees. With this revolt fresh in the minds of the Israelites, and a history of Judges who would liberate Israel from foreign oppressors before Israel's established kings, it is no wonder that the people expected Jesus to lead them in removing the Romans from their land. No one understood what kind of savior Jesus was until He had resurrected. Today we shout "Hosanna," not for what we think Jesus is going to do, but for what He has already done! He has released the prisoners, not from physical oppression, but from the bondage of our sin. Rejoice! Shout Hosanna! Jesus has set us free!
  • Mar 18, 2018“The Way of the Cross” – Rev. Allan Brooks – Mark 8:31-35
    Mar 18, 2018
    “The Way of the Cross” – Rev. Allan Brooks – Mark 8:31-35
    Series: Lent
    "Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me." Not the typical invitation to follow Jesus we are used to, but this is what Jesus declares to the crowd and His disciples. Jesus had just been teaching that the son of man must endure many things, be rejected by the religious authority and be killed and raised again after three days when Peter decided to pull Jesus aside and rebuke this teaching. Its hard to blame Peter for his response, after all, the last thing you expect to hear form the Rabi you were following for 3 years is that he was about to be killed, and was willing let it happen. Jesus tells Peter that he only has in mind human concerns, not the concerns of God. When you look at the reactions of people following Jesus and the religious leaders, the messiah that they were looking for was along the lines of the judges of the Old Testament, someone to save them from the oppressive foreign ruler and restore Israel to its former glory and right standing with God. This is the difference Jesus means with human verses God's concerns. Peter and everyone else wanted to be saved from Rome, but God desired they be saved from them selves."For whoever wants to save their life will lose it," Jesus continues "but whoever loses their life for me and for the gospel will save it." Jesus teaching is always accompanied by action, explaining the heart of God and the way of His Kingdom while serving others and providing healing for their sins. To deny ourselves, take up our crosses and follow him is to live lives of service to others, doing the work of the kingdom here on earth. This is the life Jesus taught us to lead, the life God made us to live; this is the way of the cross.
  • Mar 11, 2018Silence Please – Rev. Gary Hilton – Ps. 42:1-3, 9-10 & 1 Kings 19:11-13
    Mar 11, 2018
    Silence Please – Rev. Gary Hilton – Ps. 42:1-3, 9-10 & 1 Kings 19:11-13
    Series: Lent
    Life gets busy... and noisy, sometimes to the point that we loose God's voice in the chaos. This was the case with Elijah, the last of God's prophets from 1 Kings. Elijah had people after his life and was so consumed with fear that he stopped listening for God. Instructed to go to the Horeb, the mount of God, God presented himself to Elijah in the most unprecedented of ways. Elijah was met with an earth shattering wind, an earthquake and a roaring fire, but God was not in any of these things, rather the "shear silence" that followed. When Elijah heard it, he knew he was in the presence of God. Have you escaped the noise lately and met God in the silence? If not, this is the perfect season to do so. Take some time and go some where you know that is quiet and away from the noise, find a sanctuary, a spot in the woods. Get away for a moment and meet God in the silence. Easter is the season for renewal and redemption, so go before your God and prepare your hearts for the grace we remember and celebrate this season. Look to the world and simply ask, silence please.
  • Mar 4, 2018“Which Son Am I?” – Rev. Gary Hilton – John 2:13-16
    Mar 4, 2018
    “Which Son Am I?” – Rev. Gary Hilton – John 2:13-16
    Series: Lent
    This passage from John takes us through the account of Jesus clearing the temple in Jerusalem of the money changers and merchants selling sacrificial animals. One of the only times we see Jesus infuriated throughout the gospel accounts, we see Jesus flipping tables, spilling coins and drives the animals out with a whip. This is not just a case of business taking place in the temple, but upon arriving to the temple for Passover Jesus is witness to transactions that take advantage of those who came to worship. Inflated exchange rates and prices for Temple approved sacrificial animals worked to "enslave" the devout worshiper to what had become a corrupt system during a festival that celebrated when God freed them from slavery. Jesus sees the hypocrisy of the temple leaders and the thievery of the vendors and cleans house. In Matthew's Gospel, this account concludes with a parable about two sons; one who refuses to work for their father, but ends up working and the other who agrees to help work but never does. Jesus compares the temple to the second son, and so calls us to reflect upon this account. Individually, do we see religion as a means for personal gain or do we seek to serve others. As a church, are we so consumed with doing "church things" that we end up hurting or neglecting those we have been called to serve. Which son are we?
  • Feb 25, 2018“The Way of Light” – Rev. Allan Brooks – Matthew 5:13-16
    Feb 25, 2018
    “The Way of Light” – Rev. Allan Brooks – Matthew 5:13-16
    Series: Lent
    Salt and light, not the typical way we are used to being described, but a description that gives us direction for how we should interact with the world. So what exactly are we supposed to do to be salt and light? Well, you have heard he phrase "actions speak louder than words," and so our actions should flavor the world with God's truth and grace and provide a light that points people to God's love in the midst of their greatest darkness. We are ambassadors of hope, and the simplest actions can provide hope to people, the simplest actions can provide the biggest changes, and even the smallest light shines brightest in the darkness; for that is the way of light.
  • Feb 18, 2018The Way of Lent – Rev. Allan Brooks – John 15:1-7
    Feb 18, 2018
    The Way of Lent – Rev. Allan Brooks – John 15:1-7
    Series: Lent
    The season of Lent, the time of year of fasting and self denial in order that we may prepare ourselves for Christ's sacrifice on the cross. Lent begins this amazing 12 week journey in the church from self denial before Easter in order to draw closer to God, to anticipating the receiving of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost; a wonderful season of drawing closer to God, and celebrating His redeeming grace. This season is the way of lent. This week we are reminded that we cannot do anything separate from God, and so we begin this process of removing the things that separate us from Him. "I am the true vine, my father is the gardener," Jesus says. "I am the vine, you are the branches. If you remain in me and I in you, you will bear much fruit." Let us spend this time to remain close to Christ, to be pruned and cared for by God and bear the fruit of the Kingdom in the world, for this is the way of lent.
  • Feb 11, 2018“What is Your Name?” – Rev. Gary Hilton – Isaiah 62:1-9
    Feb 11, 2018
    “What is Your Name?” – Rev. Gary Hilton – Isaiah 62:1-9
    Series: Epiphany
    Names mean everything to us. They are more than just how we identify ourselves against the rest of the world, they are personal, relational and intimate. If you have ever given something a name, you know that you end up forming a bond with it and if anything happens to that thing, you feel for it. You see, names are how we connect to and understand our world. Our names, whether given names, nick-names or the things we call ourselves or are called based on our actions, are how we establish who we are in the world. We are intimately connected with these names we are given or give ourselves, but all to easily forget the names God gives us. He calls us His beloved, His children, heirs with Christ, and my favorite for Isaiah; "mine." God claims us, gives us a new name, and by doing, gives us an identity that we can stand firm in. We are God's, let us never forget that. Let us live in the brilliance of the names that God gives us and leave behind the ones that weigh us down.